Classic, Elastic, FFA Faced

Waistband Finishes

Check out this wonderful post At FitForArt. It contains

Faced w/ Optional Tab to secure

Classic Waistband with right side extension

Elastic Pull Up waist so comfortable, so easy to sew

Thank you Rae. <clap><clap>  Excellent post!  The above finishes are all free. The post also contains links to her available-for-purchase  variations for a fly front, trouser details, and sporty details.

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5682 - Jeans, Airlie, DG2

The DG2 Crotch Shape

I not only read you comments, but I take them to heart. So when it was suggested that I buy a new pair of my DG2 jeans and trace that crotch, I thought “Why not?”.  Just so happens Diane Gilman had just put her jeans on sale. I pay between $60-80 for DG2 jeans. I didn’t need another pair but for $30 I couldn’t pass the sale up. I used this opportunity to buy a slightly different color, Olive, that still needs my needs for my bottoms to be neutral. I wouldn’t wear olive with every color in the rainbow. But I can’t think of a thing in my closet I would not pair with the Olive jeans. I know it might not always be the best color combination but it will look OK.  So with suggestion from TheYellowRose in my ear and a new pair of DG2 jeans in hand, “Why not?”

I used the masking tape method.

It goes pretty fast. Does use a lot of tape. I didn’t copy the entire leg. I copied the back from yoke to 4″ of inseam. The front I copied from waistband to 4″ of inseam. Once taped, I carefully removed and placed on tissue paper where I smoothed and firmly pressed.

Before trimming away the excess tissue and stray tape ends to reveal a neat copy:

 

Next step was comparing with my 5682 and the Airlie pant. I still have the tissue on which I copied both patterns. 5682 is the Orange colored lines; Airlie is in blue. I tried to align crotch point and upright with each for a pic.  BACKS:

FRONT

It’s hard for me to pinpoint the grain of fabric after it’s sewn so I did try to align grain lines.

I was surprised at how different the DG2 is from either 5682 or Airlie. I thought Airlie would have less circumference being as the fabric recommended has 40% stretch while the DG2 measures 20-25%.

Over all, I thought DG2 would be very close to 5682 (orange lines). It was stunningly different both front and back.

I satisfied my curiosity but otherwise, not sure where I am going with this.  Your comments and suggestions are again, more than welcome.

 

3200 Sally's Pant, Elastic as Waistband

Embroidered Summer Pants

So into my stash I dug to find an excellent poly cotton in light blue. This is such a wonderful fabric. I wonder if it is still in production because this came from the old Walmart $1 table over 2 decades ago. At the time I bought 5 yards of every color they offered. Sniff, not only are those days over, this is the last of those fabrics; a fabric that handles and wears so well.

I didn’t spend an inordinate time choosing my embroidery design.  Knew immediately that it would be something small with lots of repeats.

A single motif would have had a lot of embroiders complaining it was too small to be any good. Repeated 3 rows and umpty-frat number of times across a 22″ hem it becomes impressive. Oh and took 4 hoopings, total 207,352 stitches and 3 days to finish. (4 bobbins, three 5000-yard spools of machine embroidery thread.) But it was worth it.

I used Silhouette Pattern 3200.  I had slimmed the leg hem. Originally it was 22″ and I slimmed it down to 20″.  I wanted a fuller leg. Something I wear occasionally even though I know the slimmer leg is more flattering and works with more tops. To make the hem fuller, I laid the fabric out, placed pattern pieces on top and with my tailor’s chalk  drew a vertical line from about thigh height to hem; angled to add 1″ at the side seam hem. I was envisioning a wider hem, but this is good.

Not only is the leg width not the best, this is also not a flattering stance!

I had to do a little playing to use the Elastic as Waistband method that Peggy Sagers introduced in her 3-Piece Yoga Pant Pattern 3418.  Initially, I had a lot of trouble wrapping my head around this waistband construction.  I even wrote Peggy whose response was something to the effect of just read it carefully and you’ll get it.  I did; and I grew to like this application even though initially it  seemed really weird to have visible elastic.   I’m wondering, will the feeling the white elastic looks like my underwear sticking out, will I get over that  and start liking the white elastic?  Time will tell and I’m not really sure it matters since I usually wear my blouses untucked which totally covers the waistband anyway.

So as I started to say, I needed a little playing to get this right for SP3200.  I cut the fabric as usual; serge finished all the edges; stitched the side seams and then spent 3 days embroidering the hems. Construction felt like nothing from that point. I zoomed through serging the inseams and stitching the crotch. I didn’t bother fitting because I’ve used this pattern many times after working at the fit through the first muslin. But I stopped at the waistband to ‘give it  think’.  My fabric waistband finishes 1″ wide. Sits at the waist and extends 1″ above. I like it. It feels secure unlike some of these low-rise crotches that I swear will be revealing all in seconds.  I cut my elastic the usual length for this brand. I am using the WAWAK 2″ elastic.  Developed quite a fondness for it but I keep a record of each elastic I purchase and the length that finally fit for me. All elastics are not all the same. For example, another excellent elastic I purchase from Cutting Line Designs is not snug enough unless I cut it 7″ shorter than my waist circumference. I joined my elastic in a circle by butting the ends and using a 3-step zig zag with a short length of bias tape beneath.  Really makes a nice flat join. Up to this point construction was pretty much typical with a 3-day break to embroider.  My thinking on the waistband went like this:  I’m using a 2″ elastic. I don’t want it to sit or extend higher than a fabric waistband would sit. So I need to trim some length at the top of the pant. How much? Well normally my WB extends 1″ above the waist which I still want. So 2″ wide elastic  -1″ wide WB,  would leave 1″ of elastic unneeded. Turn the thought around and that would be 1″ at the top of the pant not needed. Unsure because the elastic application instruction have me stitching 3/8″ above the bottom edge of the elastic, I basted the elastic to the pant 1-3/8″from the top of the pant. A quick try-on told me my initial thinking was correct. Spritz and rip the elastic from the pant and restitch after placing the elastic 1″ below the top of the pant.  Perfect!

And here it is worn with the camp shirt finished just days before:

:

Man, I can just see me walking barefoot down the beach!

 

3418, Elastic as Waistband, Silhouette Patterns

3418: Depth (darting) Issues

If I had been following Peggy’s Pants Fitting Procedure, at this point I would reach back there and pinch a dart across my rear to remove all the wrinkles and mess below the seat. That does work. It works for me.  I was so excited when I first discovered the effectiveness of a hip line dart, that I trashed all my fitted pants patterns and refit using Peggy’s LCD process. Trouble was, the hip line dart worked only for the first wearing or two. Then the pant, regardless of pattern used, would change and I’d find that mess again. By find, I mean I would be taking pics of back view of tops and see the wrinkles on my backside.  My first thought had been to increase the hip line dart.  At one time my dart was 2″ deep (4″ total removed from back crotch length).  The result is that the waistband no longer sits level at the back waist-it dips- and the cheeks are — well I may as well not have worn anything. That’s how well they were silhouetted. So I had to trim the crotch. I’d trim away 1/4″ at a time until my cheeks were no longer “ghosting through”.  The pants would look great!!!  Just wonderful —– for the first wearing or two. I’ve no doubt the hip line dart was helpful, but it wasn’t the full solution. With B5682, I chanced upon a longer crotch length. Initially I had expected to trim away some of the stride length.  To my surprise, the first B5682 looked much better than any of my other pants (excepting my RTW DG2’s). I added a little length. Holy cow!  Not only did the back wrinkles go away,  they didn’t return.  I’ve been carefully watching my first few makes of 5682 (first use Oct 2017) and the wrinkles don’t return. Ah ha! I’m onto something.

So when I trotted downstairs to work on the depth issues of 3418,  rather than pinch a hip-line dart I ripped open the inseam. I let  out the inseam 3/8 both front and back thereby adding length to the stride of the crotch. And more pics:

OK s there are still wrinkles but I had to ask, how does this compare with before I made the adjustment:

 

Before Adj ——————————————After Adj

I’m going to say that adding the 3/4″ length (3/8*2=3/4) improved the wrinkles but not that much. Did it affect the rest of the pant negatively:

Not much.  The right leg is still be affected by my knee support. Interestingly, the front crotch key hole is a little more pronounced.

The original keyhole has gotten larger and is now flanked by 2 ghosts.  The tummy area itself looks better

I’m rather surprised by this development. At least this time I did something to the crotch which could have caused a change. Hmmm in fact I did 2. All the previous day  I had felt like the crotch was still a little long. But took no further action.  Today I not only made it longer by adding length to the stride, but I also settled my waistband more comfortably and definitely lower than the day before. This action would have put more fabric into the waist to crotch area. Well, not more,  just compressed it into the area. Sort of like a corrugated tin roof. Before the tin is corrugated into little ripples it’s quite a bit longer and straighter. Next up, time to tweak the crotch length.  I’ve had this in the back of my mind since the first crotch length adjustment. Now it is time to do it

So I go downstairs and decide I need to take the WB off to adjust the crotch length.  Then I decide I may as well remove the 1″ added back at the tissue stage because I obviously didn’t need it and I projected I would be struggling with even more fabric than before.  Once I got the WB off and the extra I added trimmed away, another thought occurred to me.  Sort of like the TV ad where the guy has been hunting a car. A girl comes along and finds it in 2 secs. His sarcastic reaction “Well, let’s just do it your way.” Remember that?  It’s about the way I felt.  I’ve done my best to avoid this waistband because the way I read the instructions, I don’t like the process or final result. But as long as I’m back to Peggy’s draft, I may as well take a few minutes and “do it your way”.  Hey Peggy, this would be a good Thursday topic. Either I didn’t read the directions correctly or the waistband was not easy. I’ve already posted my experieence HERE. It’s important to note, that after apply Peggy’s WB, the crotch feels right and this is the final look:

Which sadly did not further improve the fit either front or back. If anything, front looks worse. So time to try the Hip Line dart and face the fact, this really is going to be a muslin.

Let’s speed through a bit. I made a 1″ deep hip line dart (removing total 2″ from back crotch).  Didn’t see an improvement with the fit, so I made a 1″ inseam dart. Well judge for yourself.

W WB  ————- Hip Line Dart———-Inseam Dart— original

I’m honestly stumped. None of my alterations has so far achieve a noticeable improvement in the fit of the back leg .  I would say that the hip-line dart actually looked better by itself than the subsequent addition of the Inseam Dart (taken at the top of the right inseam). All views are only slightly better, if at all since the first fit before I made any corrections. I am disappointed. I have fit Silhouette Pant Patterns 3200 Sally’s Pant  and 3414-Woven Yoga. Both had the huge leg associated with plus size patterns (finishing with 20-27″ hem circumference). They are not perfectly fit, but look far better than the any of the pics above. I’ve been adding a little at a time to the stride of the 3414 making the rest of the wrinkles disappear a little at a time.  I’m pretty happy with 3414 and keep making more pants with it. So what now?

I don’t know maybe it’s time to think a bit more.

 

 

Elastic as Waistband, WaistBand Collection

3418 Elastic Waistband

My sewing angel and I have been talking back and forth about this very interesting waistband.  I have a couple of fitting posts, but I wanted to share this now so she could see my pics. Read quickly because if Peggy complains, this whole post is going in the trash so quickly you’ll wonder if I even typed it.

Peggy says this a simple waistband that you will just love.  When I settled in to really making it, I had to read a single instruction  (like a single sentence  and sometimes half a sentence)  and execute it and then read the next. I’m adding my pics (you’ll have to buy the pattern to see her pics because I’m very certain copyright covers her pics).  Here it goes

First part is easy, no page numbers but titled “Prepare Waistband” .

Cut elastic to the length you like, join it in a circle. 

OK, got that. Can do. Moving along through the assemble pant stuff and stop at “Attach Elastic Waistband”

With Right side of elastic waistband against Right Side of pant assembly, and with the elastic seam matched to center back of pants, pin band to pants aligning the pant top edge to the center of the 2″ wide elastic “

I read that and thought “God in heaven what does this mean?” So I grab my elastic; scratch my head, look ahead and decide we’re trying to aligning the top edge of the pant to the middle of the elastic.

Well I’ll never be able to keep that straight and attach to the pant, so I start by basting a line along the 1″ center of the elastic

Moving on:

Align the elastic seam at center back, then divide evenly to align elastic to center front of pant and then at side seams

Crap how am I going to keep that straight? Pinning comes soon but I’m never going to make the matches with pins or under the needle without some help. So I find the half way point of the elastic by folding in half with back on one fold and front on the other.  Chalk mark.  Refold the elastic to front and back match and now the folds indicate the quarter point side seam marchs. Chalk mark each. Here’s a sample of one of my chalk marks.

Can find those when needed, so onward!

Stretch elastic evenly to fit those sections. Pin in place before sewing.

Another instruction I understand and can do. Here’s what it looks like from the inside of the pant

ie pant aligned to the middle of the elastic and pinned in place; and here it is looking from the right side

Next instruction was  a duzy to me

Stitch through both layers of pant and elastic, stitch 3/8 inch from top of pant edge…

Holy cow. I look front side; back side. Scratch my head again and then align my SM’s foot with the edge of the pant edge and stitch. Looks like this on the pant inside

and here it is looking from the other side

BTW I’m using water-soluble thread in the bobbin because I’m thoroughly confused and thinking I may need to rip this out several times.  But I continue steadfastly

which will be 1-3/8″ from the top of the elastic band. 

I pull out my seam gauge and take a measure:

Hey! Checks out so I may be doing something right after all.

Flip top edge of elastic band to inside of the pant.

That’s an action shot. I can hardly give you decent still shots. In fact I apologize for the blurriness of some of my photos.  I took 2 or 3 each step of the way and shared the best.

The wrong side of the elastic will now be inside the pant and the seam of the pant will be in-between the elastic and the pant.

OK, flip the elastic and take a look.  Looks interesting, not sure I like this and about 90% sure I’ve done something wrong.

Do not secure the elastic with any additional stitching…. waistband will be held in place when on you body… Only 5/8 inch of the elastic will show from the right side of the pant.

 

Well hush my mouth. It does:

Full view

Instructions go on to say the elastic will stay in place without any further stitching. I have my doubts, but I will try it out. Also I’m like 99% disliking the look ..b-u-t… it won’t be visible when I wear it because I always wear my tops out not tucked.

I must admit  that returning the pant to the drafted crotch length was the right thing to do.  The crotch looks and feels about the right length both back and front. (Please ignore the upward/downward traversing of the waistband. My waist is like a roller coaster.)  Peggy always says to trust her and (hanging head) I really should have.

 

 

 

 

906, DG2, Shorts

The Rose Shorts

I talked about the embroidery elsewhere. Here I want to discuss sewing; construction choices.

I’m using a remnant I think from the now defunct Mill Ends in Sioux Falls. I truly miss that store. They had a small section of designer fabrics –rejects for one reason or another. Like too much stock; didn’t use in time; or  crap for fabric. I also have a proclivity for upholstery fabrics. Many are  manufactured in much wider widths and are higher quality than  dressmaking fabrics; also surprisingly,  better priced. (For example, when I considered fiber and width, dressmaking silks were more expensive and of lesser quality than silks in the HomeDec dept).  This 100%, loosely woven canvas came from the upholstery remnants section of the store. Just barely 1.25 yards by 54″ wide. Just not enough for a pair of pants for my frame. Could have been a vest. In fact I think I did consider making it into a vest but never got that done. I need shorts now and I’m particularly interest in grey rather than black for summer.

This is a nonstretch fabric. It does not even possess the “give” of denim. I knew immediately I would be using Trudy Jansen’s 906 Fashion Jean. TJ906 is my goto pattern for nonstretch fabrics and has been or several years.  Long enough for me to have developed several variations. About a year ago, I developed what I call the DG2 Waistband..  OK, I didn’t really develop this waistband. I bought a pair of jeans from Diane Gilman and realized what a sweet waistline finish she had used. I got my french curve and a la Peggy Sagers, copied it.  Essentially, the front is extended at the top to include the waistband. The back yoke and back waistband are combined into a 2nd piece. The waistband pattern piece,  is retained as the facing. Front pockets are not used. They would be a PITA, but optionally stitching which suggests there is a front pocket can be used. (I didn’t this time).  DG2 uses back pockets. Sometimes I do sometimes I don’t.  Lack of fabric was the deciding factor this time and these shorts have neither front nor back pockets. I installed a zipper because hello nonstretch? I need a way to get in and out. DG2 sometimes uses a zipper sometimes not. With the 8″ of stretch in DG2’s jeans they don’t need a zipper.  I top stitched the back yoke seam. Mostly because it has a tendency to twist which can be irritating during wear.  I also did 2 rows of top stitching on the hem mostly because the first row wasn’t high enough to secure the edge. That edge would have rolled again being an irritant during wear. (I’m surprised at how many RTW details can be traced back to making a garment easier to sew or more comfortable to wear. Listen to the hawkers on TV and you’d think it’s all about beautiful you. Nope.) When I installed the facing, I used 2 rows to secure the bottom edge because hey that looks like real jeans but also to echo the dual lines of stitching along the  hem.

Must confess to one heart stopping moment during construction.  I’ve made this pattern so many times that I just assumed it still fit. About half of the shorts I’m wearing every day were made, I thought, with this very same pattern. My existing shorts are comfortable. They fit the way I want. I thought I had both the shorts and long leg versions nailed! My heart stopping moment came when I aligned the waistband with the top of the waist. The CF is marked 1.5″ from the cut edge. The entire waistband was not long enough to finish the upper edge! Even using the 3″ designed as beyond the CF.  What happened?  I don’t remember having this issue before. No remarks in my blog about a too short WB or too long waistline — even when using the very same DG2 waistband center front over/underlap. The only thing I can think of is that I did not cut and sew immediately.  I cut the pieces. Hung them while doing the embroidery and then stitched my shorts. The pieces hung for 2 days. I did not stay stitch or fuse, so it is possible that the waistline had stretched, I just doubt that it stretched 3″.

Instead of taking everything apart, adjusting and restitching, the way my Home Ec teacher would have insisted, I applied the facing, top stitched leaving the edges open along the zipper.  Then I threaded 1.25″ elastic through the channel created by the top stitching.

I stitched the elastic and the facing along the zipper and then again at the side seams.

I Frey Checked the edges of the elastic and trimmed close with my pinking  disk.

That stitching is enough to keep it all secured and the elastic evenly distributed.  The elastic cheat? It’s one I learned/developed several years ago when having to deal with an expandable waist and tailored pants. The elastic is undetectable. The waistline fits no matter how much I eat or how bad the IBS becomes.

I will not change the waistband at ATM. I will keep it in mind as a possible future alterations. What does concern me is that the side front and the side back do not match. After all this time,  I’ve made many pants and shorts, I don’t understand the mismatch. It would be easier to miss in a stretch fabric. I noticed it first with the cavanvas fabric because I had to stretch the sides slightly. Well more than slightly

The sides seams are  really rounded and bubbly. It does almost completely press out

However is evident in the side views:

Have to admit, even the back seems to be a little loose

(I may take these in just a bit after the first wear and launder.)

I looked carefully at my previous shorts and said “Darn. They’ve got it too.”.  Meaning that this excess length has been there a while and not the result of the DG2 waistband treatment.

Well despite that little issue,  I think these pants are just beautiful.  In retrospect, I wish I hadn’t taken the time for embroidery.  Canvas tends to pull free at the seams.  I did use a 2.5″ stitch length at the SM, N (which I think is also 2.5) on the serger. I don’t know what it is about canvas that helps it escape from seams. I just know that I feel a pang of regret realizing this canvas probably won’t last 2 seasons. This much beauty deserves a place in my closet for several years.

Elasticized, Straight, StyleArc, Talia

Talia: Straight, Elasticized Waistband

As disgusted as I was with YED2, I did not quit sewing. I switched instead to a TNT, the Style ARC Talia, and made shorts. I did want something super ease to sew and no fitting issues.

I’m still needing shorts. As I wore the survivors from last year, I found several that are too tight in the waist. Funnily enough, they feel fine in the morning but must be undone after dinner — if not before. I decide to copy the Talia and make a shorts pattern.  In past years I’ve simply folded up the leg. That doesn’t quite work.  I don’t seem to fold the same amount on both legs and then I’m ‘making it work’. … And I do. I do make it work but I prefer to avoid the frustration of ripping and stitching and pic’ing over and over to get it right. So I traced from waist to the knee notches.  I drew horizontal lines at 3″, 4″ and 6″ above the knee notch.  See I’m also not sure what length is right for me. Oh I know it when I look in the mirror but I’ve never measured. I can’t quantify; can’t assign a number to where the hem should fall for me. I’ll make this pair 3″ above the knee …. which will really be 4.25″ above the knee because I’ll make a 1.25″ hem. No pockets. I don’t want to twiddle with this.  No zippers but that has more to do with the fabric. And the simplest of waistbands the straight, elasticized.

My fabric is a rayon, fine-hounds tooth. The teeth are about 2mm. I use a similar fabric a few years back although it was a remnant from a failed blouse project. To my surprise, the rayon made a comfortable pant and the hounds tooth works well with nearly all prints. Somehow the eye doesn’t find the hounds-tooth jarring when placed against prints.  Especially a small hounds tooth, like this one. The eye seems to blend it into a grey; not reading a shape at all.  Downside is that like all rayons, that pair shrunk.   I was able to use it for 2 seasons but only after reinforcing the crotch.  Houndstooth will blow out in the rear.

Construction was really simple. I did the waistband first, but I’ll talk about it in detail at the end of this post. I serge finished the waistband then serged the front to back inseams. That gives me too big pieces to which I fuse interfacing along what will be a hem.  I serge finish the hem, then serge the side seams and crotch.  I reinforce the crotch at the sewing machine and hem the shorts by top stitching which disappears into the pattern of the cloth.

Onto the waistband

Talia has a two piece waistband.  Since I haven’t developed the expertise to join the two pieces without a jog, I’ve moved on to a much simpler waist treatment.  I measured the length of the two pieces, added together and subtracted 2 seam allowances. For me that equals 49″. No that’s not my waist. If you happen to follow my instructions, don’t use your waist measurement. The old waistband is 4.5″ wide. So I cut my waistband 4.5″ wide and 49″ long. I serge finish both sides before joining the short ends.  I fold the waistband in half lengthwise, press and set aside.  Don’t use your waist measurement to cut the elastic either.  I used a 1.25″ elastic cut 34″ long because when I put this elastic around me and pull, that is the shortest length that is also comfortable. Other elastics may require other lengths.  I join the elastic by butting the ends and stitching over a scrap of fabric. I zigzag once over each end and then once down the center where they abut. Then I Frey Chek the stitching and trim the excess fabric scrap. It creates the nicest, flattest, most comfortable join I’ve ever used. I have to credit Nancy Zieman for that one and I think she learned it from someone else. I quarter both my waistband and elastic; then snug the elastic into the waistband meeting the quarter marks and pinning through both elastic and waistband. Without removing the pins, I stitch about 3/8″ from the serge finished edges of the folded waistband first.  That joins those edges and keeps them from sliding around, changing the width of my final waistband.  I love the next part. Stitching through both elastic and waistband fabric. Technically, it doesn’t have to be done. Elastic is less likely to roll and fabric bunching less likely to occur if at least one line of stitching is made.  this time I’ve chose to use 3. 1 is 3/8″ from the edge of the waist band. #2 is 1/2″ below that. #3 is 2MM below #2.  When attached 2 & # will appear to be in the center of the waistband; #1 and the waistband will be mirrored.

 

I now quarter the pant. I learned the hard way you can’t simply assign the side seams as a quarter point. Then match the quarter marks of the waistband to the quarter marks of the pant and stitch together. I added a little black tab in the back during the stitching.  I find it really helpful during dressing to have something which says “this is the back”.

Hmmm. Do I need to trim a few threads?

If you’ve measured correctly, the waistband and the pant will be the same length.  It’s just 1:1 stitching while fighting with the elasticized portion of the waistband.  (Not much of a fight).  Final step is ironing the pant and steaming the waistband.  After all that stitching the elastic is out of shape. Steaming allows it to recover nicely.

 

These are a nice, loose pair of shorts.  I think the fashionistas are calling anything with a little leg-ease “culotte”.  I don’t think my shorts quite reach that category but could have if I  added 1″ along the side seams and of course an equal amount to the waistband. (But not the elastic).  I don’t think fit is an issue. The waist is comfortable. The pants don’t fall off my waist. The legs are supposed to be comfortably loose not necessarily flowing. I do think the next pair I make should be 1″ shorter.  Just because it’s a better proportion for me. I’m not ripping the hem out and fixing the length because I can hardly see the stitching. I’m also planning to make a pair of cropped pants that will just cover my brace. As mentioned before, it’s now a part of my everyday wardrobe. The only downside I see with this pair is that I’ll be making these again in a year or 2 because rayon shrinks.

906, DG2, Shorts, WaistBand Collection

DG2 Waistband

I want a second pair of jeans shorts. I also want to tweak the shorts pattern just a little, (legs are too long) and I want to try out a waistband treatment from my favorite Diane Gilman jeans.  From the outside my DG2  Jeans look like they have a typical contour waistband. In fact, I wore them several times before realizing it is a faced, cut-on waistband with top-stitching in strategic places.

I pulled out all the pieces from the jeans shorts just completed days ago.  I trimmed 2″ from the bottom on the leg. I think knee-length  dresses, tunics and shorts make me look shorter and stubbier.I think it’s just a proportion issue. Because I lengthen my dresses just enough to cover the knee brace, cut the tunics and shorts higher and the stubbiness goes away. Well, not completely because I am over weight and I am petite.

I traced the front and the yoke onto new paper and added 2-1/4″ (the width of my contour waistband) to the top of these two pieces:

I decided not to use front pockets, at least this first pair. I can get things ‘off’ with pockets so for a test garment I like to omit them.  But I do want to use top stitching to suggest there are pockets.  I traced along the top of the waistband and down the side seam about 8″.  Using my curve, I marked a hand opening.  then I trimmed along those lines to create this new piece:

After laying out and cutting my fabric, I align the new piece (now a pocket template)  with the side seam and waist of the front’s fabrics

and chalk along the bottom edge of the template:

I should mention, I’m already running the embroidery machine at this point.  I’ve found that I can maximize my time sewing if the embroidery machine can run while I’m doing other things. This combined with the lessor amount of embroidering I am doing, is becoming so successful that I may not need a stand alone embroidery machine.  I’ve chosen a leaf/vine like pattern and wanted more of a tone-on-tone effect vs the typical gold jean stitching. Of course I still wanted the embroidery  to show up.  My fabric is a dark grey blue. I chose dark blue grey embroidery threads but they read much brighter in the pics:

While the embroidery was stitching….

Normally, I would use the waistband pattern to cut both a waistband and a facing.  This time I needed only cut the facing. I also cut one interfacing.  I’m not sure that’s good or not. I prefer to interfacing both sides of the waistband and I won’t be doing that. I load sewing machine, serger and cover stitch with thread.  I serge-finish the side , waist and crotch before switching to the cover stitch and stitching along the chalked line of the fronts.  I proceed to insert the front zipper and stitch the two back pieces of the back leg together (I am using TJ906 with has a 2-piece back leg.)

At this point, both pockets have been embroidered. These faster embroidery machines are wonderful. I finish the pockets which involves hemming, and attaching to the back of the pant at the cover stitch machine. I use SAS to turn the edges under neatly and secure for the cover stitch machine.  I wanted to work on making the stitching at the point crisp. My bright idea was stitching to the point. Stopping and pulling the thread to the underside and repeat on the opposite side of the pocket.  Then tying the loose threads at the point and sealing with a drop of Frey Check on the underside.

I think it worked really well.  It is an extra step. Sometimes an extra step is worth taking.  I continued my usual construction routine with a few minor changes. I made my belt loops at the cover stitch as usual but I cut them 4.5″ long instead of 3″ so that I would be able to place them exactly as desired along the faux waistband. I also discovered that somehow in adding equal amounts to the top of the front and yoke made the back side longer than the front.  My first thought was I had put the yokes in backwards i.e. the deep end goes to center back and it’s not unusual for me to put the deep end on the side seam and have to rip it out. But, no, the yokes were correctly stitched.  I wondered if I did the calculation of how much to add correctly  (waistband width – seam allowances at leg top and waistband edge). I added the same to both. It shouldn’t change the overall length.   Did I trim the same amount of length from the leg bottom when adjusting leg length?  This is a close-fitting pant. My pattern pieces are really shaped. The excess, about 3/4″,  is not in the lower portion of the leg. It is between yoke and hip.  So I eased the front to the back

placed the leg over my pressing ham and steamed well.

Not perfect, but really good.  It perplexes me.  I used the same fabric and essentially the same pattern.  My only other thought is I had somehow stretch both side, back pieces. It’s something I need to watch for when I makes shorts again.

I added the facing and then top stitched through the denim and the facing fabric approximating a contour waistband.

Back
Inside

Note, I didn’t develop an overlap.  I’ll be wearing a belt, so these will probably stay up and closed. But I’m always uneasy about that and also added a tap and button to the inside:

Fit surprised me. I needed to increase the side seams 1/8″.  Why this time?  I used the same fabric last time and 3/8″ SA on the side and back leg seam.  This time the side seam needed to be 1/2″.  Other than that, fit is about as expected:

 

Which I know you can’t see because they are so dark.  Trust me, they look and feel pretty nice. I think the SOG should change on the yoke. It just didn’t feel right when sewing. My real issue is that all the top stitching I did, doesn’t really show up. I didn’t achieve the desired result i.e. copying the DG2 Waistband. My shorts look like a cut-on waistband. DG2’s looks like a contour waistband.  Maybe if I had used gold jean thread it would have been more apparent. I was copying DG2 as much as possible and she used the blue thread.  So for next time I’m purchasing jean thread in jean blue or jean black.  Also I think I also want to increase the tension so that the cover stitching tunnels just a little.  I think that would add to the illusion.