5682 - Jeans, CrotchLength/Hip/Waist, DraftingFitting, My Bowl, View B

5682B Muslin 2: The Next Step

I crossed my fingers as I made multiple adjustments to front and back. Using the second placement, I marked the curve of My Bowl. Found the largest difference, measured and annotated it.

 

Starting on the front.

(Above) The crotch was 1/2″ too tall. I trust My Bowl when it comes to crotch length. This was a surprise, but  prompted my  first change (pic below)  with a 1/4″ dart across the front to remove the excess height.

I drew a new front crotch curve trying to hit 1″, half the amount of the largest difference and trimmed the excess.  I didn’t think that through very well. I had removed the zipper fly, hollowed the crotch and then tried to replace the zipper fly. Not exactly possible as the front crotch had become extremely curved. So toss the  old fly, taped a new piece of aisle runner underneath and draw  a new fly.   I slashed from waist to about 2″ below the crotch line and stitched another piece of aisle runner beneath one side. Directly across from the largest difference on front crotch, I marked 1/2″, i.e. half amount hollowed out; realigned the two sides  with 1/2″ added where marked and stitched the other side  in place.  Trim excess tissue take big breath. Oh, I want to point out that dart beneath the crotch that terminated at the inseam.  I really want all your Silhouette Pattern devotees to know I have made that adjustment.

Onto the back,

On the far right is shown where I  sliced from waist to hem, spread and added an additional 1/2″ ease equally all up and down the back leg.  That’s the amount I had to add during fitting of Muslin 1.  I didn’t really want to add ease all the way up and down. It makes the leg larger; less. But it was the easiest action and for right now I want to know how reshaping the crotch affects the pant. next I drew a new back crotch biting into the back a mere 1/2″. It was a surprise to me. I expected the back crotch to need more reshaping. That’s not what the bowl comparison is tell me.  That’s followed by another slice from waist to just below the crotch and similar to the front and adding another piece of aisle runner. The two sides of the slice are separated by 1/2″ directly across from the marked largest difference between  My Bowl and the back pattern crotch.  Again, I’ve highlighted the Inseam Dart. I want everyone to know I made the blasted thing on both front and back.

I am not wild about the results on either front or back. They look wild and my pattern pieces have a tendency to undulate in place. I want pattern pieces to lay as flat as possible — for paper. But I’m wanting  a quick method to see how reshaping the crotch and adding an offset is helpful and how much change is needed. If this fix is confirmed, I have located a few other tissue alterations that would keep the paper flat.

Turning my attention to making a muslin, I considered ripping Muslin 1 (M1)  apart but realized I’d made a lot of changes including reshaping the crotch. Also M1 would not be large enough. I’d need to add strips and pieces which I fear would add further inaccuracy. Instead I saved  the waistband as is because it felt pretty good on and I had tweaked it 3 times to get it this close.  I tossed the rest of M1. In the muslin stash was  another fabric that is actually a better pant fabric.  It has a wild print that I don’t want to wear over my bottom. I had purchased it thinking a top.  Too heavy for a top. Too wild for a pant.  Muslin it is. it is composed of cotton and lycra and has about a 10% stretch. Enough stretch to be comfortable. Not enough to effect fit. Unfortunately though, not the best for comparing with the previous no-stretch, stiff fabric.

After 2 hours I’m ready to cut fabric and sew. Once again I have proved, construction of a pant is so quick and easy.  All the time and effort went into working with My Bowl and the Tissue! I trimmed the hems off the bottom. Why hem when you plan to wear this long enough to check a few things and then discard? Also, did you note that I said very little about the yoke?  My Bowl converged with the top of the leg and practically mirrored the CB yoke seam.  I thought no change was needed. Consequently during construction, the yoke was really eased to the top of the leg which had been spread 1/2″ for fitting. But, this is  quite in line with what I need to do with closely fitting jeans.  Do it every time I make TJ906.  Generally I need, 3 darts in back. None in front, but THREE in back. I’m not a lover of the contour waistband. It’s a requirement for nice-looking, authentic jeans. But I don’t love it because making 3 darts is much easier than easing that much of a difference. It’s done, mind you. Just not a whole lot of fun and it looks odd until it is on my body. I was ready to try on the pants when I had an “Oh crap” moment. Recall this pic..

..wherein I purposely placed the waistband above the yoke to remind myself that the waistband needed to be included in the total crotch length. Well “Oh Crap”, I didn’t do that. I almost went back to the sewing machine to make a 5/8″ tuck (my waistband is 1-1/4″ wide) when I decided to just slip them on and check.

Probably a good move as neither crotch feels too long. Front crotch length looks good. I am on the fence about the back crotch length.  I looked at front and back quickly. Then checked the side view and drew in the side seam.

I find the side seam is a real good indicator of where the fit issue is.  Interestingly this one wants to curve from waist forward and back to about mid-ankle.   There is some buckling at the knee but not the occurrence of diagonal pull/drag lines I’ve been seeing for a while.

Return to the front

Look closely at the sides. These are the “Mickey Mouse” ears I have referred to in past posts. There is no flesh filling out the curve. I think this is the reason for the curved side seam. Before I plan action to fix the ears, I compare the M2 Front  with the nicest front pic of M1

I definitely think M2 looks better. Nearly all diagonals are gone.  I see some just below the waistband. 1) there’s a lot of gathering going suggesting that the waistband and joining pieces need more fitting. For now, I’m ignoring those.  There is one fold on M2’s right hip unlike the multiple on M1.  There’s also a few downward lines around the crotch. I am not concerning myself with the rest of the leg yet.  I think the first thing is to reduce the crotch-reshaping offset. I am happy to do this as the pattern will assume a more typical appearance.

Moving along to the back and, heck, lets compare with M1 at the same time.

There are more diagonals on the back than the front. Interestingly enough, I don’t’ see the ears. The fabric of M1 was very, umm, firm so the back of the leg poofed instead of the folds I am seeing on M2. I’m not really sure the leg is better or worse. Like I said earlier comparing these two fabrics is not the going to give me the best results. But I will be able to see what is working.

Dang!  I was really hoping for a one and done. Not going to happen. First up is reducing the ears on front. Next is reshaping the back crotch  another 1/2″ which means making another crotch-offset.

9 thoughts on “5682B Muslin 2: The Next Step”

  1. your front looks terrific. It seems like you are almost there with the back! I’ve used the ‘bowl’ technique too, and it works for me better than any other method.

    1. I’m not as careful about the process as you. I only worry about aligning the bowl shape along the bottom 1/3 of the crotch.

  2. Hi Bev,

    Thanks for sharing your fitting adventures with us.

    I’ve also experimented a bit with the Bowl concept, and think (though no expert at all) that it probably works well as written for people with a fairly flat tummy. But not everyone is that shape.

    An approach that works for me is to divide the front bowl curve into the ‘leg flap’ bit and the ‘tummy flap’ bit. Both bits need to point away from the sides of the body, but the tummy flap in 3D goes forward and the leg flap backwards.

    Can’t post a sketch as a comment, so have stuck a picture on my maybe-blog (if/when life settles down) at https://little-mouselet.blogspot.com/2018/10/pants-fitting-using-bowl-for-sd-bev.html. Let me know if you are happy for me to ‘quote’ your photo.

    * is the point at centre front where you can feel the change in muscle groups at bottom of your tummy. I can see it as a small change in the pitch of your bowl curve, a few inches forward of the waterspout.

    You’ll see a black dotted mirror line from * to the waist. I’ve fudged how high up the trouser this should be, but it could be determined experimentally with big-ish seam allowances.

    The difficult bit is the shaping at *. The black solid line is sketched roughly like the mirrored tum flap, the blue is a smoothed version.

    Hope this helps
    Little Mouselet

    1. Mouselet. Yes keep the post up there. I read it quickly and want to read it again. If it helps anyone else, so much the better. Your comment about the crotch curve method working better for the flat tummied applies to all the pants fitting advice I read. Much of the advice and methods dimish in effectiveness or stop working entirely as I acquired curves. I keep flailing about with my only help being the blogs of other curvy women.

      Bev

Comments are closed.