sdBev's Pants!

A quick pair of jeans

Posted on: October 20, 2016

They were quick. Although ‘jeans’ may be a stretch.My fabric is a 100% cotton, brushed-twill in a deep-dark, almost-black, blue. Brushed twill is a wonderful fabric but not the classic denim that jeans are usually associated with.  However, I think my choice of pattern, Trudy Jansen’s Designer Jean a#906, with all its jean styling makes these jeans.

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Deep dark blue lightened 100%

Back there in late summer/early fall, I discovered that I need new ‘blue’ specifically ‘blue’ jeans. I donated a few pairs of jeans 1 of which was made from TJ906 about 6 years ago. I’m fairly sure it shrunk as opposed to my growing, because the pair I made last year still fit comfortably and the shorts made in June this summer have lovingly been put away for next summer.  So I pulled out the previous copy of TJ906 and pressed the pattern pieces carefully. I noted some pins in the pattern; placed in a narrow dart just under the butt. Reminded me that I had been seeing some slight ripples but not the big ol’ mess in back that I usually have.  I had attempted to correct the ripples last year by pinning a little dart under the butt. Didn’t work. I took out the pins, press out the dart and then made a new 1/8″ dart right at the hip line extended across both back leg pieces.  Then stitched as usual up to the waistband unit which I added using water-soluble thread. Although that is normal. Attaching the waistband with WST for the first fitting is normal for me.  After fitting most pants patterns, I stitch permanently the pockets, zipper, crotch and inseam but use WST for the first fitting along the side seams, waistband and hems. This slight deviation, stitching the side seams permanently, allowed me once last chance to easily adjust the fit. Which I didn’t need to do after all.

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I did not do any fancy top stitching or pocket embroidery.  I really just wanted to get this done and in my wardrobe. I did use a contrasting fabric for the pocket bags and waistband lining because I like to and because the lighter quilting cotton reduces bulk in both the pockets and waistband. Minor goof here, I had intended to triple zig zag stitch but used a straight stitch to understitch the waist band.  I really like the difference using the triple zig zag stitch for understitching along the waistband. Somehow it is much better at securing all that bulk and persuading it all to turn to the underside nicely.

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I used a button closure this time. I like using buttons. It’s really given me the chance to use up strays and singles but I think the slacks hooks hold better. I abandoned those regular jeans button thingys that have to be hammered on a stud. They hold the least well for me, usually coming loose the first wearing.

I made another slight goof with my front pockets. I fused the edge with tape but did not top stitch or understitch. Consequently, the pocket bag had a rolled instead of crisp edge and it wanted to roll to the outside. I knew it wouldn’t be possible to completely top stitch after the fact, so I chalked marks about 1.5″ away from the inner edge and 3/4″ away from the side seam on both pockets, and top stitched between the marks.

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I’m blaming any and all front and side  wrinkles/drag lines on the fact I’m not wearing a belt. These sit just below the waist.  I’ve noticed that with waistband that sit at the waist, all my pants will stay up in place. But the somewhat more attractive below the waist waistband, droops slightly. I really need a belt for those pants to ensure the pant stays in place all day.  Past experience tells me as soon as I put my belt on, all the drag lines seen in the pics will just disappear.

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The back, looks great. No mess under the butt.  I thought I might need to scoop the crotch a little, but it feels comfortable and looks good. I’ve been working on slimming the leg of this pattern. Out of the envelope, it has a 22″ circumference. Much too much for this petite, plump lady. I’m down to a 19″ circumference but would prefer 18″.  With each new pair, I’ve been making a little dart starting at pant leg hem slowly decreasing the circumference.  I didn’t continue to reduce the circumference this time because I was tweaking for the under butt wrinkles.  On previous patterns, I discovered that there is a point at which my narrowing of the hem starts introducing drag lines around the knees. I’m still not really sure what causes those wrinkles, so the narrowing will continue to be a slow process.

BTW, I’m not just proud of these pants for their looks. I also love that I stitched them up in less than 6 hours (I’d never make it in one of those sweat shops. I’d be first the first day. First morning.) I’m really loving that I’ve used an old Walmart fabric. It has to be older than 10 years.  I’m also delighted to have used a non-stretch fabric and achieve a comfortable result. As good as my Talia’s look, they don’t feel this wonderful. Point is, I’ve noticed that I tend to make the stretch fabrics into pants and leave the non-stretch marinating on the shelves. Stretch fabrics are more comfortable to wear. The stretch makes up for any lack of fitting. Truth is, non-stretch fabrics have to be made into good fitting garments.  Not just good fitting, because the Talia’s are good fitting, but near perfect fitting. The better the pants fit, the better they feel. I’m reluctant to use TJ906 for all my non-stretch pants, but maybe I should?

 

 

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1 Response to "A quick pair of jeans"

Bev, your “jeans” look really wonderful! The fabric sounds as if it will be lovely to wear also!

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