2016/5-11, Ottobre Design

#11 in Real Fabric

Once the muslin fits, it’s time for a ‘real’ garment, right?

 

From my stash I chose a 2-year old Hancock fabric that was marked “High End Designer”.  It has a ribbed appearance but low stretch. However, I wanted the same stretch as the test fabric and it was perfect.  I will say when purchased,  I wondered about it.  Located on the same shelf as the bottom weight Ponte’s,  I wondered if it could have been misfiled but the weight truly was good for pants. Also might have made a very warm cardigan. Properly lined and interfaced, a great jacket. But as I said, I wanted to use it now because its stretch was 10.25%.  Like the muslin fabric, I could pull really hard and make that percentage go up.  I prefer to back it down so it looks like something I’d like to wear.  I don’t remember the fiber content. It does remind me of the Woolray yarn I bought in the 80/90’s for machine knitting pants. That stuff was wonderful. Good stretch. Excellent recovery. Priced so the home MK’er could afford a pair of Jill St John or similar hi-end designer pants. (Back then I think those pants retailed about $200 and we were paying $20 per cone.  Always needed part of a second cone, though).

I pressed lightly counting on the steam to help smooth out any bubbles or slight wrinkles. Partly that’s why I think it at least has a rayon content.  Polyester or acrylic does not cooperate with low temperature, light steam. At least in my sewing room it hasn’t. Laid out my 3 pattern pieces and cut fabric. I serged inseams, side seams and crotch but basted the waistband for the first try-on. To my delight, it’s darn near perfect.

I may want to scoop the crotch a little.  The CB dips down slightly and I feel it tugging on my rear.  I’m not surprised.  I’m the one with front/back crotch anomaly i.e. my crotch isn’t horizontal to the ground. Not just that the back and front crotch lengths are different but my front crotch is higher than the back. Typically, I need to scoop the crotch just a little.  Adding length under the waistband doesn’t help. Instead it will develop little dips.  Add at the hip and the back of leg mess recurs. Nope, the adjustment for me had got to be in the well of the crotch.

For the first time I added the cuffs which I think we’re calling ‘Lanterns’. What a pain. I had to cut a second set. Originally I had added 1/2″ to the cuff side seams.  I added 1.5″ and the cuffs still wouldn’t stretch to meet the leg.  I fought the issue with my serger, breaking a needle in the process and ripping out one half the leg seaming.  Finally eased at the SM and finished the seam at the serger. Finishing was absolutely necessary. Oh, I forgot to mention I’ve never seen a ‘knit’  that raveled like this one. Making me question if it really was a knit.  For the second leg/cuff, I got out the clear elastic and gathered the leg edge first before serging.  I also basted the two raw edges of the cuff together before serging because on the first leg part of the fight was keeping the 3 raw edges aligned with the differential kicked up to 2 and tugging to try to feed the fabrics. But I finished and I’m super pleased except for one thing. These are winter pants!  The fabric is that dang heavy. I won’t be able to wear them until sometime in November!

Note:  Leg width above cuff is 19″.  Cuff edge, with my 1.5″ seam allowancess finishes at 14″ .  Better try on that cuff before serging it to the pant leg.  Nothing like a pant you can’t pull up over your foot.

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