sdBev's Pants!

Summer Shorts with Another Easy, Low Bulk Pocket

Posted on: June 10, 2013

  • In: 2013-02-143 | Pockets
  • Comments Off on Summer Shorts with Another Easy, Low Bulk Pocket

… now rapidly becoming essential, I converted Burda 2013-02-143 into shorts pattern.  I aligned my ruler with the knee tic marks on the pattern and drew a Shorts Line 3.5″ above. Then I aligned a 3.5″ strip of tissue with the Shorts Line, taped it into place and trimmed the sides perpendicular to the Shorts Line.

After that, it’s a matter of folding up and pinning the lower leg  above the newly created Shorts Line

 

My next thought was, What fabric am I going to use? I can make shorts in as little as 2/3 yard of fabric. So the first place I check is that stash of less than 2 yard fabrics I create.  In case you didn’t read this elsewhere, I arrange my fabrics by color and usage.  So all the fabrics I know will be used for coats are in a stack by themselves. As is all the fabrics intended for Home Dec projects.  From the stash of dressmaking fabrics I pull the cuts that are 1 7/8 yard or less and stack on a shelf I think of as the “Under 2’s”. This is also the shelf where I place large remnants from previous projects.  I had been organizing these strictly by length as in anything less than 2 yards but greater than 1.5 yards. Anything 1.5 yards or less but greater than 1 yard; and a 3rd area, anything less than 1 yard.  However when starting this project, I knew I would want to make several pairs of shorts all at once. Why? Well I didn’t even try on shorts from last summer.  I figured if all the long legged pants constructed before April 2013 didn’t fit, the shorts wouldn’t either. All my previous shorts were separated into donate and rag piles and summarily disposed. With this in mind, I pulled the mess of fabrics from the area ( and it was a mess) and started pulling out fabrics that would be acceptable for summer shorts.  I neatly folded and returned the rest of the fabrics to the shelf. Boy was I surprised. What previously had been one big, messy messy mess, was now not only neatly arranged but taking at least a third less storage space:

.

To say I’m pleased with myself, is an understatement. From the stack on the far left, I chose a 50″ X 1- yard cotton/lycra sateen in a lovely light blue. (You’ll see it later). I’m still concerned about the fit of the pattern. I know that with shorts, I don’t have to worry about the diagonal pulls at the knee. Now by choosing a stretch fabric, I think I shouldn’t make any more pattern adjustments but should fit the shorts to me.  That is, I know that lycra will really affect the pattern fit. If I change the pattern to accommodate the stretch sateen, it won’t be right for non-stretch fabrics. So I laid out the tissue pieces and immediately  discovered I would be short on fabric. The first thing I did was the lay the waistband opposite the specified grain.  That gave me enough for waistband but not facings or pockets.  From the  Under 2’s I pulled another remnant, the last remains from HAF2 completed last week.  I don’t really care for these two fabrics together but facings will be not be visible.

Then I decide, I really want a pocket. Pockets are so handy during the summer. Well all year, but I’m outside a whole lot more during summer and fall weather.  Having a place to tuck a Kleenex or key is practically invaluable.  I fret about pockets.I don’t have enough fabric to make a pocket of any kind. I’m down to strips slightly larger than needed for belt loops. What can I do?  I recall a particular inside pocket, that almost hides completely inside a slit. It isn’t a welt. Just a slit with the pocket inside. I have enough of the 2nd remnant to make this pocket but again I fret. This I fret because my experience has been that the heart, interior hidden or ear pocket will show just a little on the outside. What to do?

I start by constructing my own pattern. I know that women’s pockets usually have an opening at least 6″ long/wide (depends on pocket orientation). Also children’s pocket should have the same minimum because who do you think will be emptying their 3″ pockets? Mom will and Mom needs at least 6″.  So I know that my pocket needs to be at least 6″ long and wide.  Since I want to be able to put something besides my hands in my pocket and not have that something fall out, I decide my pocket should be longer/deeper than 6″. In my tissue scraps (if you sew, you end up with several stashes) was a scrap 10″ X29. I want to double check and be sure of the width, so I lay my hand upon the tissue and make a little tick mark

I rotate the ruler and draw a line the width of the tissue

It’s a small matter than to fold on the line and trim the excess length.

From here the pocket can assume various shapes. I could leave it rectangular as above, or draw a heart shape

Several shapes are possible, my favorite is the rounded bottom corner.

I like this shape because things (dirt, fuzz, lint etc) tend to accumulate in sharp-corner pockets.   The heart shape pocket with the point inserted into the waistband, has the least bulk along the waist. I prefer the wider top. I think it gives my tummy a little more support and believe me, my tummy appreciates any support it can get.

When unfolded, it looks like this:

and can be placed on the fabric either in the open, unfolded position

or positioned on a fabric fold with the tissue also folded.

.Either way once the fabric is cut, I mark the center of the pocket.

Then remember how concerned I was about the pocket showing on the outside?  And the fact I had only strips of the shorts fabric left?  The solution is to cut strips of the shorts fabrics and apply it to the center, right side of the fabric.

I fused and then stitched using one of the edge finishing stitches.  I think it’s possible to fuse only or even straight stitch those edges.  I use Steam A Seam 2 to fuse such things. My experience has been that SAS will last several washings, but eventually the joined pieces will pull free.  I do think I need to stitch the pieces together. I also prefer an edge finishing stitch rather than straight. Again my experience, but there seems to be some raveling with just a straight stitch. Maybe the amount of raveling, won’t bother you.

Once the strip is satisfactorily attached, mark the pant where you want the pocket to be.  I marked from the side inward 3.5″ and from the waist down 7″. I know I said 6″, but the seam allowance at the top will eat up some of that extra inch and another 3/4″ for inserting and removing my hand will not cause a problem.

.Align the pant and pocket right sides together along the line just drawn and the center line previously drawn on the pocket.

I don’t just guess.  I insert a pin in the top (usually the back side of the pocket fabric) and then lift that fabric and make sure my pin “nails” the line on the 2nd fabric, usually my pants.

This is one of those times when close enough, is not good enough. If I don’t do it right, now I will have problems later on.  However 3 pins is usually enough, one at the top, one in the middle and one exactly where I want my stitching to end. Then it’s onto the sewing machine where, like sewing a neckline plackett, I like to sew 1/8″ on either side of the center line.  I like to frey check the bottom

.before cutting down the center and finishing the edges.

.I also used a narrow zig zag stitch to finish those edges (after pressing) because it can be hard to keep those narrow less than 1/8″ edges contained. The zig zag nicely finishes those edges and with a pressing, looks professional.

.Oh and yes I did cut the bottom box with triangles just like a bound button hole and I used my Ruby’s tack stitch to lock the triangles into position again just like a bound button hole. I hope the next steps are easy enough not to need a series of photos. Because once the pocket looks like it does above, then the pocket is folded in half and the long side/curve is serged together. Followed by aligning the pocket in place along the top and stay stitched. Here you see that I’ve already serged the top edge of the pant and pocket. I want the edge finished during fitting.

.On the outside view, you’ll see that my pockets tend to separate just a little so that the interior of the pocket is visible.

.Maybe that’s just something weird I always do to this easy pocket.  That’s why I made the effort o put the strips of pant fabric inside the pocket.  Had I used matching fabric, that extra strip wouldn’t have been needed.

Also, I know with all these pics, the pocket seemed like a big deal. But really, the first you work it through you’ll wonder why I bothered. It is a very simple pocket, that looks good and doesn’t add a lot of bulk to any of the seams.  I know that various designers have included this pocket in their designs. Often with a slightly different shape and interesting name.  I really feel this pocket must be in the public domain.  I’ve been using a variation of it since I was a teen.

OK I’m off to work on fitting.

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